The impact of nutritional factors on the development of phosphatic uroliths using meat goats as a model for captive giraffes

Citation

Sullivan K, Van Heugten E, Ange-van Heugten K, Poore M, Freeman S, Wolfe B. 2007. The impact of nutritional factors on the development of phosphatic uroliths using meat goats as a model for captive giraffes. In Ward A, Hunt A, Maslanka M, Eds. Proceedings of the Seventh Conference on Zoo and Wildlife Nutrition, AZA Nutrition Advisory Group, Knoxville, TN

Abstract

Obstructive urolithiasis is a documented problem in domestic ruminants, such as the meat goat, and exotic herbivores, such as captive giraffe. These two species develop phosphorus based uroliths and are considered browsing ruminants. Due to the logistical challenges of performing studies with captive giraffe, a metabolic trial was conducted using meat goats as a model. The intent of this study was to determine the impact of type of diet (ADF-16 or Wild Herbivore complete pelleted feed) and complete pelleted feed to hay ratios (20 or 80% hay) on the development of urolithiasis in meat goats, in the context of captive giraffe feeding practices. The diet in which ADF-16 pellets were fed in combination with 20% hay had the lowest levels of fiber, the lowest calcium (Ca) to phosphorus (P) ratio, and the highest level of P compared to the other 3 diet treatments. From our results, we concluded that feeding the ADF-16 pellets with hay as 20% of the diet, produced a trend of high urinary P over the four week experimental period. There was also a tendency for a higher crystal count in the urine when hay was 20% of the diet. These can be considered strong risk factors for the development of phosphatic uroliths and warrants further investigation.

Sullivan – IMPACT OF NUTRITIONAL F ACTORS ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PHOSPHATIC UROLITHS USING MEAT GOATS AS A MODEL FOR CAPTIVE GIRAFFES.pdf     2 MB

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